Scrum Glossary (International Versions, April 2018)

By the end of 2017 I updated the Scrum Glossary of my book “Scrum – A Pocket Guide” (2013). A group of Scrum enthusiasts subsequently translated that updated version to different languages. A first release of those international versions was done in March 2018.

The new, April 2018, release of the international versions is now available, as a free download (PDF): Scrum Glossary (International versions) -April 2018

  • Four new languages were added: Filipino-Tagalog, French, Indian-Hindi, Turkish.
  • The definition for “Definition of Done” was rephrased.
  • A definition for “Product” was added.

Share my gratitude that following people spent quite some of their valuable time on this initiative to make these translations available for you:

  • Chinese (simp/trad): Lana Sun, Wei Lun Teh, Chee-Hong Hsia
  • Danish: Rasmus Kaae
  • Filipino: Shirley Santiago, Warren Yu
  • French: Fabio Panzavolta, Mohamed Gargouri
  • German: Uwe Schirmer, Peter Götz, Dominik Maximini
  • Hindi: Punit Doshi, Hiren Doshi
  • Italian: Michael F. Forni
  • Polish: Paweł Feliński
  • Portuguese: Leonardo Bittencourt
  • Russian: Konstantin Razumovsky
  • Spanish: Alex Ballarin
  • Turkish: Ilkay Polat, Lemi Orhan Ergin

In the document you will also find my Dutch translation. I maintain the base English version on the Scrum Glossary section of my website.

All feedback is welcome. Sharing of the PDF is equally encouraged.

Warm regards
Gunther

Scrum Recordings in English (so far)

During the summer of 2017, I took some time to work with the professionals of HigherView to create a couple of recordings on topics related to Scrum that I deeply care about. As I am considering ideas for new recordings, enjoy them here in one place (or look them, and other recordings, up at my YouTube channel):

Scrum, a simple framework for complex product delivery

Scrum Master, a mould for the modern manager

Product Owner, actually, owns the product

Product Backlog and the tea leaves effect

The future of Agile, actually, is in the small

The 3rd Scrum Wave (Will you sink, swim, or… surf?)

Re-vers-ify (Re-imagining your Scrum to re-emerge your organization)

Springtime and work anniversaries

The many congratulations today reminded me of my most recent work anniversaries.

  • April 2013, five years ago. I started Ullizee-Inc. It was a huge step to abandon my safe position at Capgemini, even when it was to move to the home of Scrum.
  • April 2016, two years ago. Letting go of exclusively partnering with Ken Schwaber and working for Scrum.org was, if not just an even bigger step, certainly a more frightening one.
  • April 2018, today. Reflecting, looking back, those were decisions I ‚had‘ to take. For they were the most honorable decisions to take.

Looking back, I regret none of my job changes, despite the losses, the pain, the regret to find we were not in it together after all. They turned out very revealing experiences in many regards, not only professionally but certainly at a personal and human level (if ever those aspects can be separated). Looking back, those were the best decisions possible. Looking back, it leaves the misleading impression that it was all part of some bigger plan.

Looking back even further, I wonder. Quite some of my many job changes actually happened in springtime. More importantly probably, every single one was based on principles and values and was a forward-looking decision, in search of a different, if not better, future.

Over time, certainly, I started recognizing, appreciating and ultimately embracing that I am good at searching, not at finding, that I am good at travelling, not at arriving. Really good at not belonging too, an outsider. Wholeheartedly however. Walking the difficult path, facing the challenge to achieve what I may find I need to achieve without being part of formal, corporate or commercial structures anymore.

There are plenty of challenges, more than I ever will be able to handle, and probably even more deciding to be on my own 2 feet. Some challenges are known, most are not. What life is all about, right?

Allow me to thrive on deliberately emerging opportunities to bring value; to the individuals, the communities, the teams, the organizations I am grateful to work with.

With love

Gunther
Scrum Caretaker
Eternal novice

The Scrum Values (poster)

While developing my book “Scrum – A Pocket Guide” (2013) I described how there is value in the Scrum Values. In 2016 the Scrum Values were added to the Scrum Guide.

The Scrum Values (poster)

As part of an on-going translation initiative by a group of international enthusiasts I have created a poster of the Scrum Values, now available as a free download (PNG): The Scrum Values (poster). Find the slightly updated description of the Scrum Values as a separate section on this website.

The Scrum Values are simultaneously needed for and emerging as part of Scrum. Values drive behavior. Scrum is a tool. Scrum is a (servant) process. Scrum is a framework. Even more however, Scrum is about behavior.

 

 

 

Professional Scrum in France

I am honoured to announce my partnership for Professional Scrum courses with the XEBIA ACADEMY FRANCE.

This is a great extension of the partnership that the Xebia Academy and I, as an independent Scrum Caretaker, have established in the Netherlands.

The Xebia Academy Netherlands has proven to be a professional training provider. They host our classes in their beautiful locations. They provide all that is needed for the course participants and myself to turn our classes into lively events. As a Professional Scrum Trainer, I am gratified to be working with them and am happy they host all my public classes in the Netherlands.

I look forward to connecting with French Scrum practitioners through my work with the Xebia Academy France. It is an important way to have deep conversations about Professional Scrum in France, to serve local Scrum practitioners and to expand my collaborations with more and more people and organizations across Europe.

The first tangible result of our collaboration is the organization of 2 Professional Scrum classes in the main offices of Xebia France in Paris:

PSM_71

A Professional Scrum Master course on 17+18 May 2018.

PSPO_71

A Professional Scrum Product Owner course on 30+31 May 2018.

The courses will run in English, although I embrace the opportunity to improve upon my French.

Scrum Glossary (International Versions)

By the end of 2017 I updated the Scrum Glossary of my book “Scrum – A Pocket Guide” (2013). A group of Scrum enthusiasts subsequently translated that updated version to different languages.

The combined international versions are now available as a free download (PDF): Scrum Glossary (International versions) -March 2018

Share my gratitude that following people spent quite some of their valuable time on this initiative to make these translations available for you:

  • Chinese (simp/trad): Lana Sun, Wei Lun Teh, Chee-Hong Hsia
  • Danish: Rasmus Kaae
  • German: Uwe Schirmer, Peter Götz, Dominik Maximini
  • Italian: Michael F. Forni
  • Polish: Paweł Feliński
  • Portuguese: Leonardo Bittencourt
  • Russian: Konstantin Razumovsky
  • Spanish: Alex Ballarin

In the document you will also find my Dutch translation.

More translations are being created. Additional initiatives are being considered.

All feedback is welcome. Sharing of the PDF is equally encouraged.

Warm regards
Gunther

The “ScrumAnd” Stance (requiring thought and discipline)

Try organizing a party in a “Yes, but…” atmosphere. The result is probably a zillion obstacles identified, but no party.
Try moving through a door with your eyes stubbornly fixated on the door frame. People seemingly can become deeply obsessed with frames-as-obstacles.

Try benefiting from Scrum in a “Yes, but…” environment, where the primary response is to raise concerns and hindrances, where the conversation is all about obstacles, and that what cannot be done.

“Yes, but” comes in many guises.

“Yes, but” is a tempting stance, offering the illusion of safety. Shifting to “Yes, and” requires thought and discipline. It requires thought and discipline to consciously look for possibilities and opportunities first, no matter how small. This does not preclude awareness of problems and obstacles, but the focal point shifts radically. Check if the door is actually open. Look at the doorway. Trust the door frame for holding the wall from collapsing if you pass the door. If the door is closed, the frame is probably not where the solution is. 

Imagine adopting Scrum from a “Yes, and” stance.

Over the past decade Scrum did more than just gain a critical mass to build on. Since Scrum’s inception in 1995 and the definition of ‘Agile’ as a set of values and principles in 2001, Scrum gradually became the most preferred way for people, teams and organizations worldwide to become more Agile. Agile crossed the chasm (2005-2006) and by now the 3rd Scrum Wave has risen.

Zeitgeist. Inclusive language and an inclusive stance are more helpful today. “ScrumAnd” is today’s way forward to help people increase the benefits realized through their manifestation of Scrum. 

“ScrumAnd” starts with Scrum. Scrum is a simple, yet cohesive framework. In a nutshell:

A Scrum Master fosters an environment where:

  1. A Product Owner assures there is a Product Backlog, an ordered list of work deemed necessary to optimize the value a product delivers.
  2. In consultation with the Product Owner, Development Team(s) pull the work from Product Backlog deemed feasible to get done in a time-boxed Sprint against an overarching Sprint Goal.
  3. On a daily basis the Development Team(s) synchronize their progress and upcoming work toward delivering a releasable version of product, available no later than by the end the Sprint.
  4. All players involved figure out what to work on next and how to best organize as from the next Sprint.
  5. Repeat.

Although crucial to optimize the benefits realized, observation shows how difficult it is to keep Scrum cohesive. There are no practices that can be left out or cut out without harmfully breaking the cohesion (covering up dysfunctions or other ways of undermining important benefits). There is no such thing as individual Scrum practices.

Observation shows how difficult it is to keep Scrum lightweight and nimble. There is no need to aggravate Scrum. The “And” in “ScrumAnd” is not the next excuse to stack practices, rules or roles on top of Scrum. Instead, Scrum can wrap many practices, as tactics to apply the overarching rules, principles and values. Such are inclusive practices. Inclusive practices are needed and even make out a specific manifestation of Scrum. When inclusive practices are applied well, cohesion is preserved in the resultant system that is still recognizably… Scrum. “ScrumAnd” is more about the overarching rules, principles and values of Scrum, than it is about inclusive practices.

“ScrumAnd” starts, and ends, with Scrum. Many roles and domains exist that may not be covered by Scrum, for which Scrum has no rules, events and artefacts in place. Practices in such domains can help an organization get more out of Scrum. They are complementary practices. Complementary practices don’t change your manifestation of Scrum. The “And” in “ScrumAnd” is not about complementary practices.

“ScrumAnd” supports thinking about how to get more out of Scrum, how to be more effective in employing Scrum, and gain agility.

The syntax of “ScrumAnd” -if any- might look like:

Illustrations of “ScrumAnd”:

  • “YES, we have a Product Owner,
    AND a dedicated, full-time Product Owner, acting from a business perspective, with a mandate, and clear decision authority increases our agility in terms of customer proximity.”
  • “YES, we have a Product Backlog,
    AND going from using it merely as an inventory of exhaustive specifications to experiencing it as a collaborative instrument that helps us focus on what is really important and valuable increases our agility in terms of our ability to deal with unpredictability.”
  • “YES, we have a definition of Done,
    AND expanding it beyond producing only coded, tested or even integrated work to creating releasable and valuable Increments increases our agility in terms of our ability to deliver actual value (and close the feedback loop with the customer base).”

The illustrations of “ScrumAnd” are just that, illustrations, representations of what might work, like some earlier illustrations. There are no universal definitions, labels or boundaries, not within an individual “ScrumAnd”, nor across several of them.

And then complexity comes into play.

“ScrumAnd” illustrations can be created for all elements of the Scrum framework. The implied “ScrumAnd” stance shifts the mind to the exploration of options and possibilities, patterns of improvements, away from the frame (Scrum) or obstacles only.

And then complexity comes into play. There is a “ScrumAnd” in understanding and employing “ScrumAnd”. “ScrumAnd” is not for judging or assessing, it is more than a simplistic model of linear progression, more than phases, maturity or other levels. Inspection without adaptation is pointless anyhow, to start with. Despite the possible creation of individual “ScrumAnd” representations, the topics they target are necessarily connected, matched, intertwined. They reinforce or diminish each other without clear cause-effect relationships.

Complexity kicks in even more. One “ScrumAnd” may not result in improved agility through Scrum. Improvement requires concurrency and comes in Increments too. Reversely, increased agility through Scrum cannot be attributed to one “ScrumAnd” alone. “ScrumAnd” abides by the sfumato principle, the reality that reality has layers and shades of gradual progression, shadows rather than cold delineations, monochromatic color areas and binary separations.

  • A PDF of this text is available for download
  • The “ScrumAnd” poster (PNG) is available for download